Anxiety is a normal reaction to situations that we regard as dangerous or threatening. We have survived because our body responds to perceived dangers by automatically preparing to defend itself and get to safety. While this reaction is helpful if a speeding car or attacking lion confronts us, the effects of long-term anxiety can compromise our life functions and tax our resources. It can also affect our ability to learn and can disrupt digestion and sleep.

Approximately one third of us will experience an anxiety-related disorder in our lifetime, and we might expect that one in five of your students currently struggle with anxiety issues. This course will help you understand and recognize anxiety dysfunction and then develop classroom strategies to support students who suffer from it. Ideally, you will establish classroom practices that teach students how to prevent anxiety escalation. Finally, you will learn how clinicians might handle anxiety and how you might support students under their care.